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Masculinity at the mass shooting in Thousand Oaks, California

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ABC News reports on female survivors of the mass shooting in Thousand Oaks, California. In the video above, you will see one woman describe what heroic young men did at the critical moment. She describes it this way:

There were multiple men that got on their knees and pretty much blocked all of us with their back towards the shooter, ready to take a bullet for any single one of us.

Abigail Shrier of The Wall Street Journal also writes about the men who helped others to safety during those terrifying and chaotic moments. She attributes their heroism to “masculinity.” She writes:

This is the masculinity we so often hear denigrated. It takes as its duty the physical protection of others, especially women. This masculinity doesn’t wait for verbal consent or invitation to push a person out of harm’s way. It sends hundreds of firefighters racing up the Twin Towers to save people they’ve never met. And it sent Sgt. Ron Helus of the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office rushing into Borderline Bar and Grill, where the shooter was waiting for him. “I gotta go handle a call,” Helus had just told his wife over the phone. “I love you.”

The way so many women have a natural ease with caring for children, so, too, do many men have the instinct to protect and serve. We can harness it, but it doesn’t proceed automatically. It is a refined sort of masculinity that must be developed and praised. The military has done this for years. Police academies and fire departments do too. Only the educated classes have learned to sneer at it. Would that they never need it.

This is the kind of masculinity we can all get behind. Read the rest here.

“So be strong, act like a man.” –1 Kings 2:2

“Act like men, be strong.” –1 Cor. 16:13

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joshuapoehls
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The 2 Couples Who Rescued My Family From The Nazis : NPR

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Gert Berliner's Swedish ID card with which he eventually entered the U.S. in 1947. He lived in Berlin until he was 14 years old. Gert escaped the Nazi death camps because his parents got him on a children's transport to Sweden in 1939. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Gert Berliner's Swedish ID card with which he eventually entered the U.S. in 1947. He lived in Berlin until he was 14 years old. Gert escaped the Nazi death camps because his parents got him on a children's transport to Sweden in 1939.

Jacobia Dahm for NPR

In recent months, I've learned that my life is bound together with two families who took enormous risks to save my father and my grandparents from the Nazis.

What I have discovered about the rescuers is both wondrous and bleak. One family, the Furstenbergs, has thrived; another, the Mynareks, is gone, seemingly without a trace.

My father, Gert Berliner, was 14 years old in 1939, when he escaped from the certain death of Nazi Germany. He left via the Kindertransport, a rescue train organized to take Jewish children away from harm and place them with families in other countries.

Uri and his father, Gert, look through old photographs in Gert's Manhattan apartment. Gert became a photographer and painter when he came to the U.S. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Uri and his father, Gert, look through old photographs in Gert's Manhattan apartment. Gert became a photographer and painter when he came to the U.S.

Claire Harbage/NPR

My dad's parents, Paul and Sophie Berliner, were trapped in Berlin. The Kindertransport did not include adults, and eventually they would be on a list for deportation to a death camp. So on Dec. 6, 1942, my grandparents went into hiding, finding refuge with their friends and neighbors, Charlotte and Fritz Mynarek.

The terrible price they paid

It was no small act of generosity. If the Mynareks were caught hiding my grandparents they, too, would be targeted by the Gestapo. But they did it anyway. And I now know that they paid a terrible price for their generosity.

Auschwitz and other concentration camps were photographed by Gert Berliner as part his book Silent Places: A Pilgrimage. Gert Berliner hide caption

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Gert Berliner

Auschwitz and other concentration camps were photographed by Gert Berliner as part his book Silent Places: A Pilgrimage.

Gert Berliner

At 8 a.m. on April 22, 1943, the Gestapo arrived at the Mynareks' apartment. Someone had betrayed them. The two couples were arrested and detained at the infamous Gestapo police station at Berlin's Alexanderplatz. Less than a month later, on May 17, my grandparents were sent to Auschwitz on a deportation train, Transport 38. They perished there.

A Toy Monkey That Escaped Nazi Germany And Reunited A Family

Fritz Mynarek was sent to Buchenwald, a death camp. He was murdered there in the winter of 1945, just months before the Nazi surrender. Charlotte was imprisoned in Ravensbruck, a concentration camp for women, for the "crime" of trying to save my grandparents.

Uri stands outside the house in Berlin where his grandparents Paul and Sophie Berliner were seized before being sent to Auschwitz. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Uri stands outside the house in Berlin where his grandparents Paul and Sophie Berliner were seized before being sent to Auschwitz.

Jacobia Dahm for NPR

The last time Charlotte saw my grandmother was in a hallway at the police station. They embraced; my grandmother was crying. Her only request for Charlotte was to get word to my father, knowing at that moment she would never see him again.

The air was different

A wall with index cards lists the names and deportation dates of Jewish citizens sent to the death camps. Sophie and Paul Berliner are listed on one of the cards. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

A wall with index cards lists the names and deportation dates of Jewish citizens sent to the death camps. Sophie and Paul Berliner are listed on one of the cards.

Jacobia Dahm for NPR

My father, who had been rescued via the Kindertransport, was taken in by the Furstenberg family in Kalmar, Sweden.

Suddenly, in Sweden he could breathe, he said. "It was like the air was different."

Gert (center) with Furstenberg children Nicke (left) and Bosse (right) in Sweden. Courtesy of Uri Berliner hide caption

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Courtesy of Uri Berliner

Gert (center) with Furstenberg children Nicke (left) and Bosse (right) in Sweden.

Courtesy of Uri Berliner

And now, 80 years later, my father, Gert Berliner, age 94, has been reconnected with the Furstenbergs. Last year in March, a Swedish journalist and writer named Claes Furstenberg was digging through documents of his own family and came across some letters. It was correspondence between his grandfather and my dad.

The discovery buried in letters

Curiosity piqued, he began to search for my father and emailed him. My father responded to Claes: Your grandfather Sigge Furstenberg saved my life. Since then, they have exchanged more than 60 emails. Claes sent my dad a soccer jersey with the colors of the Kalmar team. Various members of the Furstenberg family have visited my dad and his wife, Frances, at their home in Manhattan.

Uri Berliner stands with Swedish journalist Claes Furstenberg in front of the former Furstenberg family home in Kalmar, Sweden. Courtesy of Mary-Elizabeth Gifford hide caption

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Courtesy of Mary-Elizabeth Gifford

Uri Berliner stands with Swedish journalist Claes Furstenberg in front of the former Furstenberg family home in Kalmar, Sweden.

Courtesy of Mary-Elizabeth Gifford

It also turns out that the Furstenbergs are the same Furstenbergs who have shaped literary and culinary life in my own hometown of Washington, D.C. The late Carla Furstenberg Cohen was a founder of the city's landmark bookstore, Politics and Prose. Her brother Mark Furstenberg is a renowned baker and James Beard Award winner.

This past June, I went to Sweden and met Claes. He spent a day showing me around Kalmar, retracing my father's footsteps. We went back to the sprawling house where my dad lived as a foster brother with Claes' dad, who was exactly my dad's age — both boys were born in 1924.

Gert lived with Anna-Lisa and Sigge Furstenberg in Kalmar, Sweden. They also helped to found Kalmar's refugee committee. Courtesy of Uri Berliner hide caption

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Courtesy of Uri Berliner

Gert lived with Anna-Lisa and Sigge Furstenberg in Kalmar, Sweden. They also helped to found Kalmar's refugee committee.

Courtesy of Uri Berliner

We visited the graveyard where Claes' grandparents Sigge and Anna-Lisa are buried. We stood at the headstone together. The smell of freshly cut grass mingled with the sea air. I was reminded of what my dad said to Claes: Your grandfather saved my life.

A medal and a deportation List

Sigge Furstenberg was a successful businessman who owned a garment factory in Kalmar. While Sweden remained neutral before and during World War II, Sigge was anything but neutral or passive as Europe went up in flames. He helped Danish Jews who found asylum in Sweden after fleeing from Nazi occupation on small fishing boats in 1943. For that, he received a "medal of liberty" from the King of Denmark.

Gert, now 94, has been reconnected with descendants of the family that sheltered him from the Nazis. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Gert, now 94, has been reconnected with descendants of the family that sheltered him from the Nazis.

Claire Harbage/NPR

Sigge and Anna-Lisa were founders of Kalmar's refugee committee. Sigge became a target for Swedish Nazi sympathizers. Each town in Sweden had a list of people whose names would be turned over to the Nazis if the Germans invaded the country, said Claes. In Kalmar, Sigge's name was the first on the deportation list.

Sigge Furstenberg is not known to history like his countryman Raoul Wallenberg, who saved tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews from death camps. But he is a linchpin to my own family's history. The action Sigge took in saving my dad is also what allowed me to be born. It's why I'm here, breathing, writing these words. It's why my son, Ben, is alive. These facts, which suddenly became real to me in Kalmar, are both unsettling and clarifying.

The families connected

Selected images from Gert Berliner's book About People. Gert Berliner hide caption

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Gert Berliner

Selected images from Gert Berliner's book About People.

Gert Berliner

I sent my dad photos of Claes and me in front of the house where he lived in Kalmar with Sigge and the family — the house that was his sanctuary. And he responded, touched, more excited than I've known him to be in years. The past merging with the present in digital pixels — an image of survival and renewal. That's the reunion with the Furstenbergs. Our families are now connected in an ever expanding circle. For my father, this a happy surprise in old age. Everything about it is life-affirming.

Never recognized but not forgotten

The contrast with the Mynareks could not be more stark.

After the war ended, in 1946, Charlotte wrote to my father in Sweden. Two letters spell out the final days she and Fritz spent with my grandparents and the terrible events that followed.

Charlotte speaks of the tightly knit community in Berlin where they all lived — bombings; friends and neighbors lost. So many of the best are gone, she says.

"I have to say I am envious of the dead. ... For me everything is over," she writes.

But she tells my father, who was 21 at the time, "My dear boy ... you are still very young and have your life ahead of you."

Go forth and live.

And so he did.

The next year, 1947, my father left Sweden for America. Thriving in the freewheeling bohemian climate of New York, my dad worked as a photographer and on films, including a dreamy short called Pull My Daisy with Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. He painted. He made his own way in a new country.

Charlotte Mynarek died in 1975. She and her husband, Fritz, were childless. Their act of extreme generosity is not recognized in any historical record.

The action Sigge Furstenberg took in saving Gert is also what allowed Uri to be born and his family to survive. Nanna Navntoft for NPR hide caption

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Nanna Navntoft for NPR

The action Sigge Furstenberg took in saving Gert is also what allowed Uri to be born and his family to survive.

Nanna Navntoft for NPR

Over the past several months I have tried to find living descendants of the Mynareks. The staff at the NPR library has been working the online ancestry groups. A German colleague in Berlin, Jacobia Dahm, has dug through federal archives, phone books, death certificates and other government documents. I've reached out to Mynareks around the world on social media.

Have You Fled A Conflict? Tell Us What You Brought With You

So far we have come up empty. I will keep trying to find someone in the Mynarek family. I want to tell them what happened to their family, and mine. It has not been forgotten.

Gert Berliner packed a stuffed toy monkey when he fled Germany from the Nazis as a child. He kept the toy for more than a half-century before finally donating it to a museum, an act that led to a remarkable discovery. Read that story.

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School Punishes Male Teacher For Refusing To Watch A Naked Girl In The Boys’ Locker Room

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A Florida school district allowed a self-described transgender female student regular access to the boys’ locker room, with no advance warning to the boys or their parents. The first time she walked in, she caught “boys (literally) with their pants down, causing them embarrassment and concern by the fact that they had been observed changing by an obvious girl,” says a complaint letter to Pasco County School District from Liberty Counsel, a pro-bono constitutional law firm.

With a “gag order,” school administrators forbade teachers from talking about the change, and ordered a male P.E. teacher to supervise the potentially undressed girl in the Chasco Middle School locker room, the letter says. When he refused to “knowingly place himself in a position to observe a minor female in the nude or otherwise in a state of undress,” administrators told him “he will be transferred to another school as discipline for ‘not doing your job in the locker room.'”

In an email, an administrator initially threatened to put the male coach on administrative leave, telling him that refusing to supervise a potentially naked female student would “not be tolerated,”said Liberty Counsel attorney Richard Mast. The school’s other P.E. teacher, who is female, also objected and was ignored.

Pasco parents have yet to be informed by the school of this situation, yet the transgender student continues to have open access to private male areas, according to Liberty Counsel. Despite the initial September incident, then legal contact in October, the elected board for the district with 70,500 students has so far taken no action and administrators have refused to budge.

“Unfortunately these things are going on across the country, primarily with school psychologists and guidance counselors,” said Mast. He noted that it’s standard for public schools to pass transgender policies without informing parents, voters, or taxpayers first. That means the public only hears about it after children have been affected, withholding all opportunities for parents to prevent their child’s exposure to this kind of sexual indoctrination, confusion, and exploitation.

Last year in a Georgia public school, a five-year-old girl was allegedly sexually assaulted by a “gender-fluid” male classmate in the school bathroom after a transgender policy allowed him access. He allegedly pushed her against the wall and repeatedly jammed his fingers into her genitals while she struggled. The district refuses to believe the alleged victim and the mother has pulled her daughter from the school, which never notified her of the incident and maintains its bathroom policy.

Sex Uber Alles, and Definitely Don’t Tell the Parents

It appears Pasco schools adopted their transgender policies with no notice to their elected school board, parents, or voters. Instead, they were implemented after the district hired Jackie Jackson-Dean, a school psychologist, as a LGBT liason. Her website lists her as the “primary author of the school district’s [LGBT] best practices guide,” which names her as its”lead content developer.” That guide says transgender pronouns, locker room, bathroom, dress code, and sports access are a student’s “right.” About overnight school trips, it says:

Schools should work with the student and their family to devise a plan for the trip, based on the student’s comfort level. Remember, schools have an obligation to not disclose the student’s transgender status to other students or parents unless the student has provided explicit permission to do so (emphasis added).

So a child could be placed overnight in a room with an emotionally or mentally struggling child of the opposite sex without that child or her parents knowing. The guide gives school staff a script of “Talking Points about Gender-Inclusive Schools.” Here are some selections for responses to concerned parents and students:

By the way, this second to last point is at the very least debatable, if not flat-out untrue. Newer research indicates the spread of transgenderism among children follows the patterns of other social contagions, such as suicide. A wider body of research indicates nonheterosexuality is highly fluid and tends to dissipate over time. Psychological research shows that early or repeated exposure to sexual images and ideas damages children.

An OutCoast.com article from 2017 says Jackson-Dean uses her position at the school to connect students with an organization called Metro, which has nine Tampa Bay locations. Metro helps LGBT minors and adults meet, gives counseling to LGBT-identified and questioning people including minors, and hands out drugs that aim to reduce HIV transmission when people have risky sex. Metro website notes that the Food and Drug Administration has approved this drug for children 15 to 17, meaning legal minors.

Pasco schools have refused to require parent permission for Jackson-Dean to refer minor students to an organization that appears to enable risky sex among minors by offering prescription drugs rather than responsibly advising people with immature decision-making abilities against dangerous, life-altering sexual encounters.

Activists Wield Courts to Force Schools Into Insanity

The guide also accepts the left’s legal arguments that laws that use the word “sex” should be understood instead to mean “gender,” and says the school district will ignore the Trump administration’s reversal of Obama-era U.S. Department of Education rules that required schools to do this in the absence of any legal authorization whatsoever.

The federal “Title IX has never been interpreted this way in its entire 40-year history until the Obama administration,” Mast noted. “It’s been rejected several times in the Title VII context, until the Obama administration.”

Liberty Counsel’s letter provides many other relevant legal arguments, such as: “It is not ‘discrimination’ to respect safety and privacy rights based on biological sex; nor is it ‘discrimination’ to respect parental rights to protect their minor children; and maintain safeguards against involuntary observation or molestation by members of the opposite sex, where children have a right to sex-based privacy protections.”

Despite the lack of genuine legal support for switching the meaning of the word “sex” to the word “gender,” activist courts have largely sided with groundless LGBT claims. Mast says this is because “when the ACLU files [cases like] this they’re betting on the school district tapping out. None of these cases have been reached on the merits.”

Thus school districts around the country are caught between expensive, highly emotional lawsuits with unpredictable outcomes, and protecting children. Usually they choose to expose the children and protect their money and comfort, with as little notice to parents and taxpayers as possible. The LGBT children get told their feelings trump all and require reorienting the entire social life of the school (as well as the curriculum!), while the other 97 percent get told their feelings are evidence of evil bigotry.

Supporting LGBT Kids Means Boxing Parents Out?

An “LGBT-Inclusive School,” Jackson-Dean’s guide says, has: “Health and sexuality education that is inclusive of all sexual orientations and gender identities”; “curriculum that regularly includes information about LGBT people, history, and events”; and “Library resources and displays that are inclusive of LGBT people, history, and issues.” It also has “Proms, homecoming, and athletic events that allow for gender-neutral alternatives to ‘King’ and ‘Queen'”; and “Observations of Mother’s Day and Father’s Day that affirm all family structures.”

A school that is helping LGBT students will not only treat families as potential sources of trauma whose rejection directly leads to LGBT children’s depression and suicide, but also have “‘Out’ teachers,” “Inclusive paperwork (e.g. NOT mother/father),” and “Messaging from administration regarding non-tolerance of harassment and discrimination,” the guide says.

That guide thanks the LGBT activist organizations Gender Spectrum, GLAAD, GLSEN, and Teaching Tolerance; the U.S. Department of Education; and special interest groups National Education Association (teachers union), National School Boards Association, National Association of School Psychologists, and American Psychological Association for their input and resources.

The district’s “gender support plan” includes measures to keep the child’s medical and psychological information secret from his or her parents. It in fact forbids school staff from telling parents about their child’s sexual experimentation without the child’s permission.

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joshuapoehls
3 days ago
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School Punishes Male Teacher For Refusing To Watch A Naked Girl
Texas, Earth
MotherHydra
2 days ago
Society is broken and these are the proofs.
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Resources for Studying Zephaniah

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I’ve been studying through Zephaniah recently, prompted by the recently released ESV Expository Commentary (Volume 7): Daniel–Malachi. The commentary on Zephaniah is written by Jason DeRouchie who I’ve been following since his How to Understand and Apply the Old Testament, which is fantastic.

Andy Naselli’s companion volume, How to Understand and Apply the New Testament, is equally fantastic. I read it first and I’m still working through DeRouchie’s volume.

Jason DeRouchie has taught though Zephaniah several times, including 15 lectures given to his adult Sunday School class at Bethlehem Baptist Church in the Fall of 2015. I’ve compiled the audio recordings from those lectures into a podcast feed for easy listening.

Here are some other links that I’ve found useful for studying Zephaniah:

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joshuapoehls
3 days ago
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An Infinite Icosahedral Puzzle of the Earth

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Earth Puzzle

Nervous System designed this puzzle of Earth so that it can be put together in a variety of different ways.

This puzzle is based on an icosahedral map projection and has the topology of a sphere. This means it has no edges, no North and South, and no fixed shape. Try to get the landmasses together or see how the oceans are connected. Make your own maps of the earth!

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joshuapoehls
4 days ago
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If you accept transgender, then why not trans-aged?

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The Washington Post reports that a man wishes to self-identify as twenty years younger than he actually is. Not only that, he wants the change reflected on his birth certificate. From the report:

Emile Ratelband, a 69-year-old who feels like he’s in his 40s… is asking a court in his hometown of Arnhem, southeast of Amsterdam, to change his birth certificate so that it says he took his first breath on March 11, 1969, rather than on March 11, 1949. The judges heard his case on Monday and promised they would render a verdict in the next several weeks.

Ratelband sees his request as no different from a petition to change his name or the gender he was assigned at birth — and isn’t bothered that this comparison might offend transgender people, whose medical needs have been recognized by the American Medical Association. It comes down to free will, he maintains.

“Because nowadays, in Europe and in the United States, we are free people,” he said in an interview with The Washington Post. “We can make our own decisions if we want to change our name, or if we want to change our gender. So I want to change my age. My feeling about my body and about my mind is that I’m about 40 or 45.”

Folks are already dismissing Ratebland’s request as different from and offensive to transgender people. But the obvious question is why? In what way is this different from transgenderism? A closer look reveals that there isn’t very much of a difference at all.

According to transgender ideology, when a person feels himself to be something other than his biological sex, then his psychological identity trumps his biological reality. Ratebland is requesting the same consideration with respect to age. He feels himself to be younger than his chronological age. He’s simply asking for his psychological identity to be recognized over his chronological reality. If it is wrong and oppressive to refuse to recognize the gender identity of the transgender, then why is it any less wrong and oppressive to refuse to recognize the chronological identity of the trans-aged?

Of course, I am not at all supporting Ratebland’s claim. I’m simply pointing out that the identity claim that he is making is no different than the one being made by a transgender person. If you accept one, consistency demands that you accept the other. To accept the one while refusing the other is… well… inconsistent at best and hypocritical at worst. Either a person’s self-identification trumps all other objective indications or it does not. You can’t have it both ways.

But there will be some who will try. Just watch. They will embrace transgender claims while rejecting out-of-hand trans-aged claims, and they will embrace the inconsistency without acknowledging it as such. How do we know? Because that is how they responded to the transracial claims of Rachel Dolezal. I expect nothing different here.

Transgender ideology is a black hole of illogic, sucking toward it all manner of unreasonableness and contradiction. It is a testimony to the power of LGBT propaganda that so few people in our culture detect the contradictions. But the contradictions are no less salient simply because so many people refuse to see them. The inconsistency is a real and obvious, and it serves no one to pretend otherwise.

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joshuapoehls
9 days ago
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2 public comments
jepler
9 days ago
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I thoroughly disagree with the author's assertion of the equal epistemic(?) status of the two fields "date of birth" and "sex/gender" of a birth certificate.

I am at home with a world where a 5-second or even 50-year investigation of the shape of a body can't accurately reveal this (once assumed to be objective and unchanging) characteristic. Just think of it like pronouncing a baby a habitual criminal based on the debunked science of phrenology!

On the other hand, the truth of passing days and years seems just about as objective as anything; and find nothing particularly sinister in the way we codify it into a civil calendar which in turn enables legal contracts like "the term of the lease shall be 12 months from November 8, 2018".

Hopefully we some day arrive in a world where even if there's some reason to write down quick notes on the shape of baby genitals (one weird trick for telling babies apart with ~P(0.5)!), nobody insists on printing anything about it on our everyday ID cards, or imagines it should inform our use of pronouns or whether we should prefer white wine or lite beer.
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minderella
9 days ago
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I find this to be a very interesting question indeed, and have found myself sitting at a table not eating lunch while mulling this over.
My very first thought was of my aunt, who was 93 going on 55 and a serious whippersnapper living her life to the fullest. At 83 (still in the prime of her life), she needed a heart bypass surgery. The surgeon told the hospital that it was a waste of time, funds, etc to give an 83-year old this surgery. The nurses would not drop it and kept pestering the doc to at least *meet* my aunt to see her vivaciousness himself. He stalled for 36 hours before finally going to meet her face-to-face, when he was amazed at her health, her active lifestyle, and her alert intelligence. He scheduled the surgery after leaving her room. The surgery was successful, and my aunt lived for 12 more glorious, full years. So I completely agree that age is just a number and just because you've reached "X" years old doesn't mean you should act a certain way, or feel certain things or stop doing certain activities.
On the other hand, so many "milestones" in life are age-based. Could a 12-year old decide he's actually 22, and legally buy alcohol? Could a 14-year old decide he's 30, and marry a 32-year old? Could a 40-year old decide he's actually 8 and enroll himself in the second grade? Could I decide I'm 65 and start taking disbursements from my retirement and social security accounts now? All of these extreme situations seem to be silly and illogical, but I don't see the same extremes with a person born as a male human wishing to be recognized as a female human. Is it because with the age discrepancies, you gain rights as you age? You don't gain any rights from changing your gender or your name or even your hair color.
I believe that who we are born as and who we become are two different things. I don't think we should erase the past, while still allowing people to move on to who they are currently. I think birth certificates should have different fields for "birth " and "recognized ". My birth name was one field, but when I was adopted, my birth certificate was updated to reflect my adoptive parents were actually my birth parents. Even as a child I thought this was wrong: Mr A was not my biological father, and changing a piece of paper to say that he was doesn't make it true. Why couldn't my birth certificate remain saying my birth parents were Mr W and Ms P and my recognized parents are Mr A and Mrs A? And I feel the same about gender: the gender you were born with should remain on the initial certificate documenting your birth, but your current recognized gender is a different field.
I know there are no easy answers here, and people struggle to be recognized as the person they see themselves as, and part of that is always fluid.
A last thought on this before I get back to the office: my birth certificate says I was so many inches long/tall when I was born. Obviously I did not remain that same height (believe it or not). No one would ever look at my birth certificate and refuse to acknowledge that I'm 5'5" just because my certificate says I was 19" tall at the moment of my birth. Does the fact that I see myself as 5'5" mean I should have the right to change my certificate to say I was 5'5" at the moment of my birth? Or an even more extreme situation: what if, even though my birth certificate says I was 19" at birth, I am currently 5'5", but if I felt I was actually 1200' tall, would it make sense to allow me to change my birth certificate to say my birth height was 1200 feet?
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