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If each spouse says to the other, "I will treat my selfishness as the main problem in the marriage," you have the prospect for great things.

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If each spouse says to the other, "I will treat my selfishness as the main problem in the marriage," you have the prospect for great things.


Posted by timkellernyc on Saturday, June 23rd, 2018 3:30pm


994 likes, 288 retweets
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joshuapoehls
2 days ago
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Texas, Earth
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Those grainy Moon photos from the 60s? The actual high-res images looked so much better.

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In 1966 and 1967, NASA sent five spacecraft to orbit the Moon to take high-resolution photos to aid in finding a good landing spot for the Apollo missions. NASA released some photos to the public and they were extremely grainy and low resolution because they didn’t want the Soviet Union to know the capabilities of US spy satellites. Here’s a comparison to what the public saw at the time versus how the photos actually looked:

Old Moon New Moon

The Lunar Orbiters never returned to Earth with the imagery. Instead, the Orbiter developed the 70mm film (yes film) and then raster scanned the negatives with a 5 micron spot (200 lines/mm resolution) and beamed the data back to Earth using lossless analog compression, which was yet to actually be patented by anyone. Three ground stations on earth, one of which was in Madrid, another in Australia and the other in California recieved the signals and recorded them. The transmissions were recorded on to magnetic tape. The tapes needed Ampex FR-900 drives to read them, a refrigerator sized device that cost $300,000 to buy new in the 1960’s.

The high-res photos were only revealed in 2008, after a volunteer restoration effort undertaken in an abandoned McDonald’s nicknamed McMoon.

They were huge files, even by today’s standards. One of the later images can be as big as 2GB on a modern PC, with photos on top resolution DSLRs only being in the region of 10MB you can see how big these images are. One engineer said you could blow the images up to the size of a billboard without losing any quality. When the initial NASA engineers printed off these images, they had to hang them in a church because they were so big. The below images show some idea of the scale of these images. Each individual image when printed out was 1.58m by 0.4m.

You can view a collection of some of the images here.

Tags: Moon   NASA   photography   space
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joshuapoehls
6 days ago
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.@allisongryski, to the kids: "No, you have not figured out how to share. You've figured out how to argue and temporarily win."

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.@allisongryski, to the kids: "No, you have not figured out how to share. You've figured out how to argue and temporarily win."


Posted by dgryski on Sunday, June 17th, 2018 4:44pm


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joshuapoehls
7 days ago
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Self-control is the ability to do the important thing rather than the urgent thing.

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Self-control is the ability to do the important thing rather than the urgent thing.


Posted by timkellernyc on Thursday, June 14th, 2018 6:39pm


936 likes, 286 retweets
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joshuapoehls
10 days ago
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Everyone is watching what you do online. How user tracking with cookies works

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Have you ever visited a website to check out something you want to buy only to be inundated with ads for that product in other websites?

I’ve been asked about this enough times that I thought it would be a good exercise to try and explain how this works.

This blog post is an explanation of how websites that seem totally unrelated to each other seem to know about what you are doing online.

cookie trail of crumbles

It all starts with the Cookie

Before we describe what a cookie is (in the context of the web), let’s start by describing why they are needed.

The web is mostly a disconnected system. That’s an odd thing to say when the web is almost synonymous with being connected. What disconnected means in this context is that when you use your browser to open visit website, the browser connects to the server that hosts that website, gets the web page and disconnects. The web server only knows about you for that very brief period.

This is what allows one website to potentially serve millions of requests. It doesn’t need to hold information about you in memory for very long.

Well, if that’s the case how come we have websites that do “remember” us, where we can login and see data that is ours?

That’s where cookies come in. A cookie is information stored in your computer about the website you visited.

When you visit a website your browser sends a HTTP request to a web server that is listening at the address of that website. The web server sends back an HTTP response with the contents of the website (HTML) and some “headers”. A header is just a key value pair (for example: Server: TheServerName).

There’s a header named Set-Cookie which when present in an HTTP response will make your browser create a cookie for the website you are visiting. It’s actually a little bit more complex than this. The cookie is tied to the domain of the website, but for this discussion it’s ok if you think that a cookie belongs to one website.

Also, a cookie is just a text file saved on your computer.

Here’s an example of a Set-Cookie header from a response to <a href="http://myawesomewebsite.com" rel="nofollow">myawesomewebsite.com</a>:

Set-Cookie: the_cookie_name=the_cookie_value; path=/; expires=Tue, 06 Jun 2028 21:50:30 GMT; <a href="http://domain=.myawesomewebsite.com" rel="nofollow">domain=.myawesomewebsite.com</a>

After this response, every time you visit <a href="http://myawesomewebsite.com" rel="nofollow">myawesomewebsite.com</a> until 06 June 2028 your browser will send a Cookie header in the request like this:

Cookie: the_cookie_name=the_cookie_value

The easiest example to imagine of a website using this is a website that allows its users to pick a background color. In the response to the request to change the background color the web server will add a header like this: Set-Cookie: background_color=blue ....

Now every time you go to that website your browser will “tell” the website that you want the background to be blue, and the way it will do this is by including the Cookie header in the request: Cookie: background_color=blue.

The mechanism that allows you to log in to a website is very similar to this. When you visit a login page and enter the correct username and password the web server will send back a response with a Set-Cookie header whose contents will allow the web server to find your data. The value of this cookie is usually encrypted so that only the server can create it, and also only the server will be able to read it. This way a user can’t just change the value and potentially sign in as another person.

Tracking users with cookies

I’m sure you’ve seen messages similar to this: “We use cookies to improve your experience on our site and to show you relevant advertising“.

The way that cookies can be used to “show you relevant advertising” hinges on how they are treated by the browser. Every time your browser makes a request to a website for which it has a cookie, it will send that cookie.

Also, when the request originates form a website that is different from the website the cookie is for, the browser will add a header named Referer (yes, it’s misspelled, but that’s the way it is in the spec so we have to live with it). That header will contain the URL from the website from where the request originated.

This is simpler to understand with an example. Say you go to Wikipedia to read about the World Cup. While doing that you find something interesting in the references section that you want to explore. For example a page about the 2018 qualification that is hosted in another website that you have visited before (e.g. <a href="http://sofascore.com" rel="nofollow">sofascore.com</a>).

When you click on the link to <a href="http://sofascore.com" rel="nofollow">sofascore.com</a> your browser will add the Cookie header to the request for <a href="http://sofascore.com" rel="nofollow">sofascore.com</a> and it will also add a Referer header with the url from Wikipedia, for example: Referer: <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_FIFA_World_Cup" rel="nofollow">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2018_FIFA_World_Cup</a>.

How can this be exploited?

For simplicity imagine that the original website you’ve visited is named tracker. Now imagine tracker set a cookie for your with a value that is unique (will act as an identifier) and has a very long expiration date. Also, tracker has an agreement with loads of other websites, and those websites host a 1×1 pixel transparent image from tracker.

Each time you visit one of those websites your browser will make a request to tracker for the transparent image and send the cookie with your identifier and with the referer header. This way, not only does the tracker know who you are, it also knows which websites you are visiting.

The tracker can then sell your info to other websites that then can choose what they want to do with it. Mainly show you ads related to things they think you are interested in. It’s as simple as that.

Also, this technique is known as web beacon and it’s one of the most simple techniques. There are much more elaborate versions that will use a combination of features to “tag” you even if you delete your browser cookies.

In case you are wondering why a cookie is called a cookie maybe it’s because it’s like a fortune cookie? It has a message inside. I actually don’t know, but if you do please leave a comment.

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joshuapoehls
12 days ago
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Texas, Earth
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Share Passwords With AirDrop From iOS 12's New Password Management System

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Password managers are a great way to keep your logins secure. Instead of using Post-It Notes or spreadsheets to keep track of your passwords, password managers like 1Password — and Apple's new password management options and API in iOS 12 — allow you to store unique and difficult to crack passwords like (jW2cBCJXXhF in a way that is easily accessible and secure.

But one of the downsides to making your NYTimes password BKtat8uW(aJb is the difficulty in sharing it with someone else. There are lots of reasons you might want to share a password, and Apple has made it much easier in the new iOS 12 Beta. Now, you can share passwords with other people directly from the iOS Password Manager via AirDrop.


On an iOS 12 device, open the iOS Settings app and go to Website & App Passwords. Then, select a login, tap on the password field and an option to AirDrop the login will appear. The login can be AirDropped to any iOS 12 or macOS Mojave device. Users on both devices are required to authenticate via Touch ID or Face ID (or a regular old password, depending on which Mac you have) before the password can be sent or saved.

The new password management API (and this sharing system) is meant to streamline and simplify the way passwords work on iOS devices. Apple will automatically suggest strong, unique passwords, with iOS 12 offering the tools to create, store, and retrieve passwords no matter where an account is created. The new features work in both third-party apps like 1Password, as well as Safari. All of your passwords will be stored in iCloud Keychain no matter where they are created and they are synced across all of your devices.

For third-party password apps, such as 1Password or LastPass, Apple is adding a new Password Autofill Extension that will let these password management apps to supply autofill passwords in apps and Safari, making it much easier to enter a password stored in an app like 1Password or LastPass.

Also new in iOS 12 is a feature that lets you ask Siri to get your passwords. With a simple command like "Siri, show me my passwords," Siri will open up your iCloud Keychain after you authenticate your identity with a fingerprint, a Face ID scan, or a passcode.

iOS 12 is available now as a developer beta, with public betas expected later this month and a final public release expected in early fall.

Related Roundup: iOS 12

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joshuapoehls
18 days ago
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